False Foundations

My work is about the unattainable body image that society presents as achievable. The idea of perfection has been around since the beginning of human existence, but alters in the way it is presented throughout time. I am specifically researching around the time of 724 BCE and finding similar aspects that relate to contemporary society. Through the presentation of light, transparency paper, wood, silhouettes, and text, I bring these issues of the ideal image to the forefront based on different eras in human history. My work is representational of the ideal image that you physically cannot touch, but is always in front of our faces in the form of a representation of our society, and marketed to us as consumers as an idea that has been normalized.

I am highly influenced by our history as a species. The ideal of perfection and the ideal athlete presented itself in old Greek history and has carried over into our contemporary society. My mixed media pieces are extremely different from my video work and still imagery, because the presentation is more representative of the origin of the idea of perfection as seen through the lens of a Greek culture. Greek culture around 724 BCE aspired to be like Gods and Goddesses and viewed physical perfection as their religion, or a big representation of their spirituality and power. However, the ideas of perfection still exist in our contemporary society, and the obsession of achieving the unachievable is still a major component within all of my work and relates to our contemporary society in more ways than one.

The audience that will relate to my work the most will be those that understand the vigorous cycle of trying to obtain the ideal body composition. To create these mixed media pieces I was heavily influenced by the repetition of Andy Warhol, the text and silhouette usage of Lorna Simpson, and the educational history research by the book “The Temple of Perfection,” written by Eric Chaline. Conceptually this lead me to artists like Heather Cassils and her video work that represents the unattainable body building culture, and performance art of Vanessa Beecroft as she struggles through anorexia and body image challenges.

Unattainable Repeat

Out of Reach

“Forgive Yourself”